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Lexicon

Pattern-1 (Coat colour pattern Horse)

The PATN1 gene modifies the Leopard complex and together they lead to a increased amount of white in the pattern of at least 60% of the body, mostly to a full Leopard spotting.

If there is a mutation in the PATN1 gene but no Leopard complex, the PATN1 gene has no effect on the coat colour and the horse is a carrier for the mutation without being spotted itself.

 

Genetic Test: available in Shop

Also in the Leopard package

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Pearl (Dilution factor Horse)

The Pearl mutation lightens the coat, mane and tail colour of the horse. It is visually very similar to champagne dilution and is located on the same gene as the cream dilution factor. The Pearl mutation is mainly found in Quarter Horses, Paints and related breeds.

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Predictive height test (HMGA2 Pony)

Height in animals depends on various factors (e.g. genes, environment and their combination). A genetic variation has been discovered for the height of ponies. A base pair in the HMGA2 gene can influence/reduce height in Shetland ponies and related breeds.

This test allows breeders to estimate the height of offspring. Here, the ponies are assigned to three height groups: A/A (Small: ~ 84 cm), A/G (Medium Small: ~ 98 cm) and G/G (Normal: ~ 104 cm).

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Predictive height test (LCORL Horse)

Height in animals depends on various factors (e.g. genes, environment and their combination). Genetic variation has been discovered for the Height of warmblood horses. A base pair in the LCORL regulatory unit (on the third chromosome) determines to a large extent what height the horse will become.

This test allows breeders to estimate the height of the offspring with an accuracy of 70% (+/- 5 cm). Here, the horses are assigned to three height groups: T/T (Normal height: ~ 159 cm), C/T (Medium height: ~ 164 cm) and C/C (Tall heigth: ~ 169 cm).

This genetic variation has a smaller effect on height in non-warmblood horses.

 

Genetic Test: available in Shop

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Progressive retinal atrophy type 1 (GR-PRA 1 Golden Retriever)

Progressive retinal atrophy type I (GR-PRA 1) is caused by degeneration of the retinal photoreceptor cells and, in the course of the disease, the entire retina is destroyed. Affected animals go blind.

The hereditary disease is one of the three forms of PRA in the Golden Retriever. The inheritance is autosomal recessive.

 

Genetic Test: available in Shop

Also in the Golden Retriever B package

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Progressive retinal atrophy type 2 (GR-PRA 2 Golden Retriever)

Progressive retinal atrophy type II (GR-PRA 2) is caused by degeneration of the retinal photoreceptor cells and, in the course of the disease, the entire retina is destroyed. Affected animals go blind.

The hereditary disease is one of the three forms of PRA in the Golden Retriever. The inheritance is autosomal recessive.

 

Genetic Test: available in Shop

Also in the Golden Retriever B package (DRC P4)

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Progressive rod-cone degeneration (prcd-PRA Dog)

Progressive rod-cone degeneration (prcd-PRA) is caused by degeneration of the retinal photoreceptor cells and, in the course of the disease, the entire retina is destroyed. Affected animals go blind.

The hereditary disease is one of the three forms of PRA in the Golden Retriever, but also occurs in many other breeds. The inheritance is autosomal recessive.

 

Genetic Test: available in Shop

Also in the Labrador Retriever A Paket (DRC P1)

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PSSM1 (Polysaccharide Storage Myopathy 1 Horse)

Polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM1) is a degenerative muscle disease caused by a disorder of sugar metabolism. Affected horses show symptoms such as reluctance to move, muscle tremors and tension.

The disease occurs in many breeds. The inheritance is incomplete autosomal dominant.

 

Genetic Test: available in Shop

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PSSM2 (Equine Myopathy Horse)

Equine myopathy (PSSM2) is a collective term for a number of related muscle disorders with similar clinical symptoms. Typical symptoms include reluctance to move, intermittent lameness, stiffness, and in daily practice it can manifest as exercise intolerance. Symptoms are generally adult-onset, usually after 7-10 years of age (depending on breed and environment); mild symptoms may be obvious at a younger age or after a "trigger" leading to negative nitrogen balance.

DNA tests are now available for six variants associated with horses developing symptoms of PSSM2.

 

Genetic Test: available in Shop

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