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Blue/Silver (Coat colour D-Locus Dog)

In the Blue/Silver colour, the dog's coat, but also the skin, have a dark to light grey colour. Depending on the base colour, certain dilution effects of the colour occur.

The recessive d-allele on the D-locus (dilution) causes the optical dilution of the base colour. Here, a mutation-related loss of the MLPH gene leads to disturbances in the pigmentation of skin and hair.

However, the dilution mutation can also lead to severe health problems such as Colour Dilution Alopecia (CDA - dilution colour-related hair loss).

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Brown (Coat colour B-Locus Dog)

The dark pigment eumelanin is lightened to brown. The dog has a chocolate or liver brown coat colour. The skin also becomes lighter, recognisable on the nose and muzzle. Three recessive mutations (b-c, b-d, b-s) in the TYPR1 gene (B locus) lead to the lightening of eumelanin.

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Centronuclear Myopathy (CNM Dog)

Centronuclear Myopathy (CNM) is a hereditary muscle disease in Labrador Retrievers. The disease leads to muscle degeneration, uneven gait and a lack of patellar reflex.

The inheritance is autosomal recessive.

Synonym: Labrador Retriever Myopathy (LRM), hereditary myopathy of labrador retrievers (HMLR).

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Cerebellar Abiotrophy (CA Horse)

Cerebellar Abiotrophy (CA) describes ataxia in horses due to progressive death of brain cells responsible for movement. It occurs in Arabians and related breeds. Affected animals show balance, coordination, and movement disorders, which pose a high risk of injury to both animal and rider. Depending on the severity, the animals suffer greatly from this disease, which is why euthanasia is often considered. The disease is inherited autosomal recessively, so CA only occurs when both alleles of the TOE1 gene are affected by the mutation (ca/ca).

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Cerebellar hypoplasia | Dandy-Walker-like Malformation (DWLM Dog)

Cerebellar hypoplasia (also known as "Dandy-Walker-like malformation" DWLM) is a genetically caused malformation of the cerebellum. This leads to disorders and failures of body functions that are controlled by the cerebellum, especially movements. Symptoms are ataxia, epileptic seizures and tremor.

The disease occurs in Eurasiers. The inheritance is autosomal recessive.

 

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Champagne (Diltution factor Horse)

The Champagne mutation lightens the coat, mane and tail of the horse (dilution). Less colour pigments are produced and the base colour appears faded. Depending on the base colour of the horse, different champagne shades appear: Classic Champagne (black), Gold Champagne (chestnut), Amber Champagne (bay).

One copy of the gene is sufficient (Ch/n or Ch/Ch) to trigger the dilution of the coat colour. It can easily be confused with other dilution factors and occur in combination with those e.g. with cream dilution.

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Collie eye anomaly (CEA Dog)

Collie eye anomaly (CEA) is a developmental disorder of the eye characterised by choroidal hypoplasia (underdevelopment) and can lead to blindness in severe cases.

 

The disease occurs in Collie, Border Collie, Australian Shepherd and Shetland Sheepdog. The inheritance is autosomal recessive.

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Cone-rod dystrophy 3 | crd-PRA (crd3-PRA wirehaired Dachshund)

Cone-rod dystrophy 3 (crd3) is an eye disease in which the cones and rods on the retina degenerate. Clinical symptoms usually appear in the first 3 weeks of life and lead to total blindness in early adulthood.

The disease occurs in the wirehaired Dachshund (Teckel). The inheritance is autosomal recessive.

Synonym: crd-PRA

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Cone-rod dystrophy 4 | cord1 (crd4-PRA Dachshund)

Cone-rod dystrophy 4 (crd4) is an eye disease in which the cones and rods on the retina degenerate. Clinical symptoms usually appear in the first 3 weeks of life and lead to total blindness in early adulthood.

The disease occurs in the longhaired Dachshund (Teckel). The inheritance is autosomal recessive.

Synonym: cord1-PRA, crd4-PRA

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Congenital Myotonia (CM Horse)

Congenital myotonia (CM) is caused by a malformed channel protein in skeletal muscle cells and results in impaired movement due to muscle rigidity.

The disease occurs in the New Forest Pony and is inherited in autosomal recessivly.

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